Wall Fountains: The Minoan Culture

Archaeological digs in Minoan Crete in Greece have uncovered several kinds of channels. These were used to provide urban centers with water as well as to reduce flooding and remove waste. Rock and clay were the substances of choice for these conduits. When made from terracotta, they were usually in the form of canals and round or rectangular pipes. Amidst these were terracotta pipes which were U shaped or a shorter, cone-like shape which have only appeared in Minoan civilization. The water provision at Knossos Palace was handled with a strategy of terracotta piping which was placed below the floor, at depths starting from a few centimeters to many meters. Along with distributing water, the clay conduits of the Minoans were also used to amass water and store it. In order to make this possible, the pipelines had to be designed to handle: Subterranean Water Transportation: It’s not quite known why the Minoans wanted to transport water without it being enjoyed. Quality Water Transportation: The pipelines could furthermore have been made use of to haul water to water fountains that were split from the city’s general system.

The Source of Modern Garden Fountains

Pope Nicholas V, himself a learned man, ruled the Roman Catholic Church from 1397 to 1455 during which time he commissioned many translations of ancient classic Greek documents into Latin. It was imperative for him to beautify the city of Rome to make it worthy of being known as the capital of the Christian world. Starting in 1453, the ruined ancient Roman aqueduct known as the Aqua Vergine which had brought clean drinking water into the city from eight miles away, underwent repair at the bidding of the Pope. Building a mostra, a grandiose celebratory fountain built by ancient Romans to memorialize the arrival point of an aqueduct, was a tradition revived by Nicholas V. The present-day site of the Trevi Fountain was formerly occupied by a wall fountain commissioned by the Pope and built by the architect Leon Battista Alberti. The Trevi Fountain as well as the well-known baroque fountains located in the Piazza del Popolo and the Piazza Navona were eventually supplied with water from the altered aqueduct he had reconstructed.Influence Norman Conquest Anglo-Saxon Gardens 78517138313852397097.jpg

The Influence of the Norman Conquest on Anglo-Saxon Gardens

The Anglo-Saxon way of life was dramatically changed by the introduction of the Normans in the later eleventh century. The skill of the Normans exceeded the Anglo-Saxons' in architecture and farming at the time of the conquest. But before focusing on home-life or having the occasion to consider domestic architecture or decoration, the Normans had to subjugate an entire population. Most often designed upon windy peaks, castles were straightforward constructs that enabled their occupants to spend time and space to offensive and defensive strategies, while monasteries were rambling stone buildings frequently added in only the most fecund, broad valleys. Gardening, a peaceful occupation, was impracticable in these unproductive fortifications. Berkeley Castle, potentially the most unspoiled style of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture, still exists now. The keep is said to date from the time of William the Conqueror. As a method of deterring attackers from tunneling underneath the walls, an immense terrace encompasses the building. A scenic bowling green, covered in grass and bordered by battlements clipped out of an ancient yew hedge, creates one of the terraces.