Anglo Saxon Gardens During the Norman Conquest

Anglo Saxon Gardens Norman Conquest 86564539.jpg The Anglo-Saxon way of life was dramatically changed by the arrival of the Normans in the later eleventh century. The skill of the Normans exceeded the Anglo-Saxons' in design and agriculture at the time of the conquest. But before concentrating on home-life or having the occasion to contemplate domestic architecture or decoration, the Normans had to subjugate an entire population. Castles were more standard constructions and often built on blustery hills, where their tenants spent both time and space to practicing offense and defense, while monasteries were large stone buildings, mostly situated in the widest, most fertile hollows. Relaxing activities such as gardening were out of place in these destitute citadels. Berkeley Castle is possibly the most intact model in existence nowadays of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture. The keep is said to date from William the Conqueror's time. An enormous terrace encompasses the building, serving as an impediment to assailants attempting to dig under the castle walls. One of these terraces, a charming bowling green, is covered grass and flanked by an old yew hedge cut into the form of crude battlements.

From Where Did Water Fountains Emerge?

The translation of hundreds of classic Greek texts into Latin was commissioned by the learned Pope Nicholas V who ruled the Church in Rome from 1397 until 1455.Water Fountains Emerge? 49715680683317.jpg It was important for him to beautify the city of Rome to make it worthy of being known as the capital of the Christian world. Starting in 1453, the ruined ancient Roman aqueduct known as the Aqua Vergine which had brought fresh drinking water into the city from eight miles away, underwent reconstruction at the bidding of the Pope. Building a mostra, a grandiose commemorative fountain built by ancient Romans to memorialize the arrival point of an aqueduct, was a custom revived by Nicholas V. The architect Leon Battista Alberti was commissioned by the Pope to put up a wall fountain where we now see the Trevi Fountain. The aqueduct he had refurbished included modifications and extensions which eventually allowed it to supply water to the Trevi Fountain as well as the renowned baroque fountains in the Piazza del Popolo and the Piazza Navona.

Outdoor Fountain Engineers Through History

Often working as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and highly educated scholars all in one, from the 16th to the later part of the 18th century, fountain designers were multi-faceted people, Exemplifying the Renaissance artist as a imaginative master, Leonardo da Vinci worked as an inventor and scientific expert. The forces of nature led him to explore the qualities and motion of water, and due to his fascination, he carefully captured his findings in his now celebrated notebooks. Innovative water exhibits packed with symbolic significance and all-natural grace converted private villa settings when early Italian water feature designers fused imagination with hydraulic and gardening expertise. The humanist Pirro Ligorio provided the vision behind the splendors in Tivoli and was renowned for his skill in archeology, architecture and garden concepts. Other water feature engineers, masterminding the phenomenal water marbles, water attributes and water antics for the many mansions near Florence, were well-versed in humanistic topics and time-honored scientific texts.

Gian Bernini's Water Features

There are numerous famous fountains in Rome’s city center. One of the most distinguished sculptors and artists of the 17th century, virtually all of them were designed, conceived and built by Gian Lorenzo Bernini. His expertise as a fountain creator and also as a city architect, are observable all through the roads of Rome.Gian Bernini's Water Features 9262862524.jpg Bernini's father, a renowned Florentine sculptor, mentored his young son, and they ultimately moved to Rome, in order to fully express their art, primarily in the form of public water fountains and water features. The juvenile Bernini was an great employee and attained encouragement and backing of significant painters as well as popes. At the start he was renowned for his sculptural expertise. Working gracefully with Roman marble, he used a base of experience in the ancient Greek architecture, most especially in the Vatican. He was affected by many a great artists, however, Michelangelo had the biggest impact on his work.