Outdoor Water Features Found Historical Documents 935891637.jpg

Outdoor Water Features Found in Historical Documents

Water fountains were initially practical in function, used to bring water from canals or springs to towns and villages, providing the inhabitants with clean water to drink, wash, and cook with. Gravity was the power source of water fountains up until the conclusion of the nineteenth century, using the forceful power of water traveling down hill from a spring or brook to push the water through spigots or other outlets. Striking and impressive, large water fountains have been crafted as monuments in many civilizations. When you see a fountain at present, that is definitely not what the first water fountains looked like. The first accepted water fountain was a rock basin carved that was used as a receptacle for drinking water and ceremonial purposes. The first stone basins are believed to be from about 2000 B.C.. The force of gravity was the power source that controlled the oldest water fountains. These historic fountains were built to be functional, often situated along reservoirs, streams and waterways to furnish drinking water. Fountains with ornamental Gods, mythological beasts, and creatures began to appear in Rome in about 6 BC, crafted from stone and bronze. Water for the community fountains of Rome was delivered to the city via a elaborate system of water aqueducts.

"Primitive" Greek Artistry: Outdoor Statuary

The first freestanding statuary was designed by the Archaic Greeks, a distinguished accomplishment since until then the sole carvings in existence were reliefs cut into walls and columns. For the most part the statues, or kouros figures, were of adolescent and attractive male or female (kore) Greeks. The kouroi, viewed as by the Greeks to symbolize beauty, had one foot extended out of a strict forward-facing pose and the male statues were always undressed, with a powerful, sturdy build. The kouroi started to be life-sized starting in 650 BC. The Archaic period was tumultuous for the Greeks as they evolved into more refined forms of government and art, and acquired more information about the peoples and societies outside of Greece. However, these conflicts did little to impede the progress of the Greek civilization.

Rome’s Early Water Transport Systems

Rome’s Early Water Transport Systems 730845002991.jpg Previous to 273, when the very first elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in Roma, inhabitants who lived on hillsides had to journey even further down to gather their water from natural sources. During this time period, there were only two other systems capable of delivering water to elevated areas, subterranean wells and cisterns, which amassed rainwater. To provide water to Pincian Hill in the early 16th century, they implemented the new tactic of redirecting the current from the Acqua Vergine aqueduct’s underground channel. As originally constructed, the aqueduct was provided along the length of its channel with pozzi (manholes) constructed at regular intervals. The manholes made it easier to maintain the channel, but it was also possible to use buckets to remove water from the aqueduct, as we saw with Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi when he operated the property from 1543 to 1552, the year he passed away. The cistern he had built to collect rainwater wasn’t satisfactory to meet his water specifications. To give himself with a much more efficient means to assemble water, he had one of the manholes opened up, offering him access to the aqueduct below his residence.