The Origins of Contemporary Wall Fountains

Origins Contemporary Wall Fountains 7813647823.jpg Himself a learned man, Pope Nicholas V led the Roman Catholic Church from 1397 till 1455 and was responsible for the translation of scores of age-old texts from their original Greek into Latin. In order to make Rome deserving of being the capital of the Christian world, the Pope resolved to enhance the beauty of the city. At the bidding of the Pope, the Aqua Vergine, a damaged aqueduct which had carried clean drinking water into Rome from eight miles away, was reconditioned starting in 1453. The ancient Roman tradition of building an imposing commemorative fountain at the point where an aqueduct arrived, also known as a mostra, was restored by Nicholas V. At the bidding of the Pope, architect Leon Battista Alberti undertook the construction of a wall fountain in the place where we now find the Trevi Fountain. The Trevi Fountain as well as the well-known baroque fountains located in the Piazza del Popolo and the Piazza Navona were eventually supplied with water from the modified aqueduct he had rebuilt.

Find Serenity with Outdoor Water Features

Simply having water in your garden can have a considerable effect on your health. The sounds of a fountain are great to drown out the noise in your neighborhood or in the city where you reside. This is a place where you can relax and enjoy nature. Many therapies use water as a healing element, going to places such as the seaside and rivers for their treatments. If what you seek out is a calming place where you can take your body and your mind to a faraway place, put in a pond or fountain in your garden.

Rome’s Early Water Delivery Systems

Previous to 273, when the 1st elevated aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in Rome, citizens who dwelled on hills had to go even further down to collect their water from natural sources. During this period, there were only two other systems capable of providing water to elevated areas, subterranean wells and cisterns, which gathered rainwater. Beginning in the sixteenth century, a unique program was introduced, using Acqua Vergine’s subterranean sectors to supply water to Pincian Hill.Rome’s Early Water Delivery Systems 90175569092942419492.jpg All through the length of the aqueduct’s route were pozzi, or manholes, that gave access. Whilst these manholes were developed to make it simpler and easier to conserve the aqueduct, it was also feasible to use containers to extract water from the channel, which was practiced by Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi from the time he obtained the property in 1543 to his death in 1552. The cistern he had made to gather rainwater wasn’t sufficient to meet his water requirements. To give himself with a much more useful way to assemble water, he had one of the manholes opened, giving him access to the aqueduct below his residence.

Anglo-Saxon Landscapes at the Time of the Norman Conquest

The arrival of the Normans in the later half of the 11th century substantially altered The Anglo-Saxon ways of living. At the time of the conquest, the Normans surpassed the Anglo-Saxons in building design and cultivation. But there was no time for home life, domestic architecture, and decoration until the Normans had conquered the whole realm. Castles were more fundamental constructions and often constructed on blustery hills, where their tenants devoted both time and space to practicing offense and defense, while monasteries were major stone buildings, mostly located in the widest, most fertile hollows.Anglo-Saxon Landscapes Time Norman Conquest 7172555068859.jpg The barren fortresses did not provide for the peaceful avocation of gardening. The early Anglo-Norman style of architecture is represented in Berkeley Castle, which is most likely the most unscathed sample we have. It is said that the keep was developed during William the Conqueror's time. An enormous terrace encompasses the building, serving as an obstacle to assailants attempting to dig under the castle walls. One of these terraces, a charming bowling green, is covered grass and flanked by an aged yew hedge trimmed into the shape of crude battlements.