Ancient Greece: The Origins of Garden Statue Design

A good number of sculptors were paid by the temples to accentuate the elaborate pillars and archways with renderings of the gods right up until the stage came to a close and countless Greeks started to think of their religion as superstitious rather than sacred, when it became more common for sculptors to portray ordinary people as well. Affluent individuals would often times commission a rendition of their ancestors for their large familial burial tombs; portraiture also became prevalent and would be appropriated by the Romans upon their acquisition of Greek society. The usage of sculpture and other art forms differed over the years of The Greek Classical period, a time of creative growth when the arts had more than one goal. Whether to gratify a visual desire or to commemorate the figures of religion, Greek sculpture was an imaginative practice in the ancient world, which may be what draws our focus today.Characteristics Garden Sculpture Archaic Greece 0225068663461.jpg

Characteristics of Garden Sculpture in Archaic Greece

Archaic Greeks were well known for providing the first freestanding statuary; up till then, most carvings were formed out of walls and pillars as reliefs. Most of these freestanding sculptures were what is known as kouros figures, statues of young, attractive male or female (kore) Greeks. The kouroi were seen by the Greeks to represent beauty and were sculpted with one foot leading and an uncompromising stiffness to their forward-facing poses; the male statues were always strapping, brawny, and naked. In 650 BC, life-sized forms of the kouroi began to be seen. The Archaic period was tumultuous for the Greeks as they evolved into more polished forms of government and art, and obtained more information and facts about the peoples and civilizations outside of Greece. The Arcadian conflicts, the Spartan penetration of Samos, and other wars between city-states are examples of the types of clashes that emerged commonly, which is consistent with other times of historical transformation.Builders First Garden Fountains 59099712650621851.jpg

Builders of the First Garden Fountains

Often serving as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and highly educated scholars all in one, from the 16th to the later part of the 18th century, fountain designers were multi-faceted individuals, During the Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci illustrated the artist as a inspired wizard, creator and scientific expert. He methodically documented his observations in his currently famed notebooks, following his mind boggling curiosity in the forces of nature led him to explore the characteristics and mobility of water. Early Italian water feature designers transformed private villa configurations into inspiring water showcases full with symbolic meaning and natural beauty by combining imagination with hydraulic and gardening expertise. Known for his incredible skill in archeology, architecture and garden design, Pirro Ligorio, the humanist, offered the vision behind the wonders in Tivoli. For the assorted mansions close to Florence, other water fountain designers were well versed in humanist topics as well as ancient technical texts, masterminding the extraordinary water marbles, water features and water antics.

The Impact of the Norman Conquest on Anglo-Saxon Gardens

The Anglo-Saxon way of life was considerably changed by the introduction of the Normans in the later eleventh century. The expertise of the Normans exceeded the Anglo-Saxons' in design and agriculture at the time of the conquest. But the Normans had to pacify the entire territory before they could focus on home life, domestic architecture, and decoration. Because of this, castles were cruder structures than monasteries: Monasteries were frequently immense stone buildings set in the biggest and most fertile valleys, while castles were constructed on windy crests where their residents dedicated time and space to projects for offense and defense. Gardening, a placid occupation, was unfeasible in these fruitless fortifications.Impact Norman Conquest Anglo-Saxon Gardens 01384832601.jpg The finest specimen of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture existent today is Berkeley Castle. The keep is rumored to have been developed during the time of William the Conqueror. An enormous terrace encompasses the building, serving as an obstruction to attackers attempting to dig under the castle walls. A picturesque bowling green, enveloped in grass and surrounded by battlements cut out of an ancient yew hedge, creates one of the terraces.