The Impact of the Norman Invasion on Anglo-Saxon Gardens

The introduction of the Normans in the second half of the eleventh century irreparably altered The Anglo-Saxon lifestyle. Engineering and gardening were abilities that the Normans excelled in, trumping that of the Anglo-Saxons at the time of the occupation. But before concentrating on home-life or having the occasion to think about domestic architecture or decoration, the Normans had to subjugate an entire population. Most often built upon windy summits, castles were basic constructs that permitted their occupants to spend time and space to offensive and defensive schemes, while monasteries were rambling stone buildings frequently added in only the most fecund, broad valleys. The serene method of gardening was impractical in these bleak bastions. The early Anglo-Norman style of architecture is depicted in Berkeley Castle, which is perhaps the most untouched sample we have. The keep is reported to have been developed during the time of William the Conqueror. A monumental terrace serves as a hindrance to intruders who would attempt to mine the walls of the building. One of these terraces, a charming bowling green, is covered grass and flanked by an aged yew hedge trimmed into the form of crude battlements.

The First Modern Wall Fountains

The translation of hundreds of classical Greek texts into Latin was commissioned by the scholarly Pope Nicholas V who ruled the Church in Rome from 1397 till 1455. It was important for him to beautify the city of Rome to make it worthy of being called the capital of the Christian world. In 1453 the Pope commissioned the rebuilding of the Aqua Vergine, an ancient Roman aqueduct which had carried clean drinking water into the city from eight miles away. A mostra, a monumental commemorative fountain built by ancient Romans to mark the point of entry of an aqueduct, was a custom which was restored by Nicholas V. The architect Leon Battista Alberti was directed by the Pope to put up a wall fountain where we now see the Trevi Fountain.First Modern Wall Fountains 9911907347645.jpg The aqueduct he had reconditioned included modifications and extensions which eventually enabled it to supply water to the Trevi Fountain as well as the famed baroque fountains in the Piazza del Popolo and the Piazza Navona.

The Multiple Styles of Wall Water Fountains

You can find tranquility and quiet when you add a wall fountain in your backyard or patio. Moreover, it can be made to fit into any wall space since it does not take up much room. The requisite elements include a spout, a water basin, internal tubing, and a pump regardless of whether it is freestanding or secured. Traditional, modern, antique, and Asian are just a few of the styles from which you can consider.

Usually quite large, freestanding wall fountains, also known as floor fountains, have their basins on the ground.

You can decide to put your wall-mounted fountain on an preexisting wall or build it into a new wall. Incorporating this type of water feature into your landscape adds a cohesiveness to the look you want to attain rather than making it seem as if the fountain was merely added later.Water Transport Strategies Historic Rome 759004750017423559.jpg

Water Transport Strategies in Historic Rome

Aqua Anio Vetus, the first raised aqueduct founded in Rome, started out delivering the men and women living in the hills with water in 273 BC, though they had counted on natural springs up until then. Outside of these aqueducts and springs, wells and rainwater-collecting cisterns were the sole technologies readily available at the time to supply water to areas of high elevation. Starting in the sixteenth century, a newer program was introduced, using Acqua Vergine’s subterranean sections to supply water to Pincian Hill. As originally constructed, the aqueduct was provided along the length of its channel with pozzi (manholes) constructed at regular intervals. While these manholes were provided to make it simpler and easier to maintain the aqueduct, it was also possible to use buckets to remove water from the channel, which was utilized by Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi from the time he purchased the property in 1543 to his death in 1552. Whilst the cardinal also had a cistern to collect rainwater, it couldn't supply sufficient water. To give himself with a much more efficient system to obtain water, he had one of the manholes opened, offering him access to the aqueduct below his residence.

The One Cleaning Solution to NEVER Use On Your Outdoor Fountains

Water fountains will last a very long time with regular cleaning and maintenance. Leaves, twigs, and bugs often find their way into fountains, so it is important to keep yours free from such things. Additionally, anywhere light from the sun combines with still water, algae can develop. In order to prevent this, there are some basic ingredients that can be mixed into the water, such as vinegar, sea salt, or hydrogen peroxide. Bleach can also be dissolved into the water, but this is not an ideal option because it can sicken birds or other animals.

Experts suggest that the typical garden fountain undergoes a thorough scouring every 3-4 months. The first step is to get rid of all the water. When it is empty, clean inside the reservoir with a mild cleanser. Feel free to use a toothbrush if needed for any stubborn crevasses. Do not leave any soap residue in or on the fountain.

It is highly advised taking the pump apart to better clean the inside and remove any plankton or calcium. You might want to let it soak in vinegar for a few hours to make it quicker to wash. If you want to remove build-up in your fountain, use rain water or mineral water versus tap water, as these don’t contain any ingredients that will stick to the inside of the pump.

One final recommendation for keeping your fountain in top working order is to check the water level every day and make sure it is full. If the water level falls below the pump’s intake level, it can hurt the pump and cause it to burn out - something you don't want to happen!