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A Wall Water Feature to Match Your Decor

Placing a wall fountain in your backyard or patio is perfect when you want to relax. Even a small space can include a custom-built one. The necessary components include a spout, a water basin, internal tubing, and a pump regardless of whether it is freestanding or secured. You have many styles to a lot to choose from whether you are in search of a traditional, modern, classical, or Asian style.

Also knownas a floor fountain, a stand-alone wall fountain is normally rather big, and its basin is placed on the ground.

On the other hand, a water feature affixed to a wall can be added onto an existing wall or built into a new wall. This type of fountain adds to a cohesive look making it seem as if it was part of the landscape rather than an added feature.Father Rome's Garden Fountain Design Style 493510013718.jpg

The Father Of Rome's Garden Fountain Design And Style

There are many celebrated Roman water fountains in its city center. Gian Lorenzo Bernini, one of the finest sculptors and artists of the 17th century planned, created and constructed nearly all of them. His skills as a fountain developer and also as a city architect, are evident throughout the roads of Rome. A famous Florentine sculptor, Bernini's father guided his young son, and they ultimately went to Rome to thoroughly showcase their art, primarily in the form of community water fountains and water features. An diligent employee, the young Bernini received compliments and patronage of various popes and important designers. At first he was recognized for his sculpting skills. An authority in ancient Greek engineering, he utilized this knowledge as a platform and melded it seamlessly with Roman marble, most famously in the Vatican. Though he was influenced by many, Michelangelo had the most profound impact on him, both personally and professionally.

The Genesis Of Wall Fountains

The incredible architecture of a fountain allows it to provide clean water or shoot water high into air for dramatic effect and it can also serve as an excellent design feature to complete your home.

Originally, fountains only served a functional purpose.Genesis Wall Fountains 88360690534668335.jpg Inhabitants of cities, townships and small towns used them as a source of drinking water and a place to wash up, which meant that fountains had to be linked to nearby aqueduct or spring. Up to the late 19th century, water fountains had to be near an aqueduct or reservoir and higher than the fountain so that gravity could make the water flow down or jet high into the air. Fountains were an optimal source of water, and also served to adorn living areas and memorialize the artist. Bronze or stone masks of animals and heroes were commonly seen on Roman fountains. Throughout the Middle Ages, Muslim and Moorish garden planners included fountains to create mini variations of the gardens of paradise. King Louis XIV of France wanted to demonstrate his superiority over nature by including fountains in the Gardens of Versailles. The Romans of the 17th and 18th centuries manufactured baroque decorative fountains to glorify the Popes who commissioned them as well as to mark the location where the restored Roman aqueducts entered the city.

Since indoor plumbing became the standard of the day for fresh, drinking water, by the end of the 19th century urban fountains were no longer needed for this purpose and they became purely ornamental. Fountains using mechanical pumps instead of gravity helped fountains to deliver recycled water into living spaces as well as create unique water effects.

Modern fountains are used to adorn public spaces, honor individuals or events, and enrich recreational and entertainment events.

Water Delivery Strategies in Historic Rome

Rome’s very first raised aqueduct, Aqua Anio Vetus, was built in 273 BC; prior to that, people living at higher elevations had to rely on natural streams for their water. When aqueducts or springs weren’t easily accessible, people living at greater elevations turned to water taken from underground or rainwater, which was made possible by wells and cisterns. Beginning in the sixteenth century, a new system was introduced, using Acqua Vergine’s subterranean portions to deliver water to Pincian Hill. Pozzi, or manholes, were built at regular stretches along the aqueduct’s channel. Even though they were primarily planned to make it possible to service the aqueduct, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi started using the manholes to collect water from the channel, opening when he bought the property in 1543. It seems that, the rainwater cistern on his property wasn’t enough to meet his needs. To provide himself with a much more effective means to assemble water, he had one of the manholes exposed, giving him access to the aqueduct below his property.